Blog

Welcome to the blog for the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Posts on this site are the opinion of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Federation, its staff or its board of directors. Entries are posted in the language of the author.

Members of the university research community are invited to make guest blog submissions on issues relating to the wellbeing of the humanities and social sciences research and learning enterprise in Canada. Click here to read the Federations’ blog policy. Please send your submission to communications@ideas-idees.ca.

100 volumes on understanding nationality

Guest blog by Shirley Tillotson, Professor Emeritus, Department of History, Dalhousie University, and Inglis Professor, University of King’s College

The Canadian Historical Review celebrates its 100th volume this year. It was among several new national organizations that were born in the nationalist years following the First World War. In the journal’s September issue, I looked back at the CHR's history. Being the journal of a national history has been a fine thing, but it means something different now, something more ambiguous, than it did on the CHR's previous anniversaries in 1944, 1970, and 1995.

Contributors to the CHR have usually been professional Canadianists. It’s to be expected that they would investigate the nation. This was especially so...

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Creating the Spaces Where I Belong: Phenomenology of an African Canadian Professor

Guest blog by Tamari Kitossa, Associate Professor, Sociology, Brock University

This essay is a modified contribution to the forthcoming collection The Nuances of Blackness in the Canadian Academy, edited by Awad Ibrahim, Tamari Kitossa, Malinda Smith and Handel K. Wright. I wish to express my appreciation to Anita Jack-Davies, Carl James, Delores Mullings and Awad Ibrahim for commentary on various stages of this paper. Errors and omissions are mine.

Introduction            

           Phenomenologically the lifeworld of an African Canadian professor is fraught with ambivalence,...

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Federation welcomes three new scholarly association members

Lily Polowin, Communications Coordinator, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Please join us in giving a warm welcome to three new Association members! Each of them was voted in by existing members at the Federation’s first-ever virtual Annual Meeting, which took place on May 15, 2019. Read on to learn more about each one — their mission, their leadership and what motivated them to join the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. [Pssst…. And next month, we’ll be introducing two new institution members who joined the Federation membership as well.]  

The ...

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Back to school 2019 - What is the media saying?

Lily Polowin, Communications Coordinator, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Since I started working for the Federation on May 31 (the first day of Congress 2019), I’ve been doing all I can to get up to date on the conversations the media is having about post-secondary education in Canada. With the rhythms of a new semester starting up, here is a summary of what makes back to school 2019 unique. Happy reading!

Equity and representation in academia are top of mind for many this back-to-school season. The Canada Research Chairs program recently updated its equity measures with ...

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Positioning Blackness, Necessarily, Awkwardly, in the Canadian Academy

Guest blog by Handel Kashope Wright, Professor and Director of Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, The University of British Columbia

This blog is based on a paper presented on the panel #Black Professors Matter: Experiences in White Academe at the 2019 Canadian Sociological Association Conference. The paper is an abridged version of “The Awkward Presence of Blackness in the Canadian Academy,” a contribution to The Nuances of Blackness and the Canadian Academy, a forthcoming book co-edited by Awad Ibrahim, Tamari Kittosa, Malinda Smith and Handel Kashope Wright.

The Canadian academy at the present historical juncture, like much of the academy worldwide, has become the neo-liberal academy in a time of extended austerity. Academic work is now highly stressful...

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